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Rebecca F Sundseth

from Durham, NC
Age ~60

Rebecca Sundseth Phones & Addresses

  • 4315 Branchwood Dr, Durham, NC 27705
  • Buffalo Junction, VA

Publications

Us Patents

Electrochemical Detection Of Nucleic Acid Sequences

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US Patent:
6391558, May 21, 2002
Filed:
Apr 14, 2000
Appl. No.:
09/549853
Inventors:
Robert W. Henkens - Beaufort NC
John P. ODaly - Carrboro NC
Marek Wojciechowski - Cary NC
Honghua Zhang - San Diego CA
Najih Naser - Orlando FL
R. Michael Roe - Apex NC
Thomas N. Stewart - Durham NC
Deborah M. Thompson - Raleigh NC
Rebecca Sundseth - Durham NC
Steven E. Wegner - Chapel Hill NC
Assignee:
Andcare, Inc. - Durham NC
International Classification:
C12Q 168
US Classification:
435 6, 435 911, 435 912, 422 681, 422 50, 422 62, 422 63, 422 67, 422 69, 422 8201
Abstract:
An electrochemical detection system which specifically detects selected nucleic acid segments is described. The system utilizes biological probes such as nucleic acid or peptide nucleic acid probes which are complementary to and specifically hybridize with selected nucleic acid segments in order to generate a measurable current when an amperometric potential is applied. The electrochemical signal can be quantified.

Electrochemical Detection Of Nucleic Acid Sequences

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US Patent:
7169358, Jan 30, 2007
Filed:
Feb 25, 2002
Appl. No.:
10/082714
Inventors:
Robert W. Henkens - Beaufort NC,
John P. O'Daly - Carrbor NC,
Marek Wojciechowski - Cary NC,
Honghua Zhang - San Diego CA,
Najih Naser - Orlando FL,
R. Michael Roe - Apex NC,
Thomas N. Stewart - Durham NC,
Deborah M. Thompson - Raleigh NC,
Rebecca Sundseth - Durham NC,
Steven E. Wegner - Chapel Hill NC,
International Classification:
G01N 15/06
G01N 21/76
G01N 21/00
B32B 5/02
C07H 21/00
C12Q 1/68
US Classification:
422 681, 435 6, 422 52, 422 55, 422 821, 422 61, 536 231
Abstract:
An electrochemical detection system which specifically detects selected nucleic acid segments is described. The system utilizes biological probes such as nucleic acid or peptide nucleic acid probes which are complementary to and specifically hybridize with selected nucleic acid segments in order to generate a measurable current when an amperometric potential is applied. The electrochemical signal can be quantified.

Electrochemical Detection Of Nucleic Acid Sequences

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US Patent:
7455975, Nov 25, 2008
Filed:
Jan 3, 2007
Appl. No.:
11/619232
Inventors:
Robert W. Henkens - Beaufort NC,
John P. O'Daly - Carrboro NC,
Marek Wojciechowski - Cary NC,
Honghua Zhang - San Diego CA,
Najih Naser - Orlando FL,
R. Michael Roe - Apex NC,
Thomas N. Stewart - Durham NC,
Deborah M. Thompson - Raleigh NC,
Rebecca Sundseth - Durham NC,
Steven E. Wegner - Chapel Hill NC,
Assignee:
ESA Biosciences, Inc. - Chelmsford MA
International Classification:
C12Q 1/68
US Classification:
435 6
Abstract:
An electrochemical detection system which specifically detects selected nucleic acid segments is described. The system utilizes biological probes such as nucleic acid or peptide nucleic acid probes which are complementary to and specifically hybridize with selected nucleic acid segments in order to generate a measurable current when an amperometric potential is applied. The electrochemical signal can be quantified.

Immobilizing And Processing Specimens On Matrix Materials For The Identification Of Nucleic Acid Sequences

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US Patent:
6103192, Aug 15, 2000
Filed:
Apr 14, 1998
Appl. No.:
9/060282
Inventors:
Marilyn J. Stapleton - Durham NC
Rebecca Sundseth - Durham NC
Ke Wei - Durham NC
Assignee:
GeneTec Corporation - Durham NC
International Classification:
G01N 2100
US Classification:
422 50
Abstract:
The invention is a method and device for collecting and processing a biological specimen for the analyses of nucleic acids. A device comprises a matrix to which cells and viruses adhere and a handle to manipulate the matrix. The devices are used to collect, dry, transport, store and process small amounts of blood or other tissue. The matrix of the device is transferred to a reaction tube and amplifying reagents added to it. Nucleic acid sequences and relative quantities are detected and analyzed from the same specimen. The relative amounts of amplified nucleic acid from one or more particular RNA sequences are compared to one another and to the amount of amplified nucleic acid from DNA sequences serving as an internal control for the number of biological units per specimen. The relative amounts of amplified viral sequences from suspected viruses in the biological specimen and from recombinant viral particles serving as a viral quantitation standard enable estimation of viral burden in a given quantity of specimen.
Rebecca F Sundseth from Durham, NC, age ~60 Get Report